What to do

You are going to produce a resolved zine that includes a whakataukī or kupu Māori to visually communicate your personal relationship with a site of historical significance.

A resolved artwork is a single significant artwork. It is the most effective communication of an idea or narrative with the appropriate technical finish.

Before starting this Assessment Activity, you will:

  • visit a site of historical significance
  • generate a wide range of visual resources to work with when you create your zine
  • select a whakataukī/whaktauākī or kupu Māori that reflects your personal relationship with the site
  • explore typography, photographic, and drawing imagery
  • explore zine processes, materials and techniques.

See Getting Started and Student Resources for guidance.

Assessment Activity: Resolved zine

Zine size — one A3 page (approximately 165mm x 210mm) folded into eight.

Use the most successful designs from your in-class experiments to develop and produce your final zine.

Step 1: Plan your zine

  • Identify the key conventions of zines and select the processes, materials, and techniques you will use.
  • Create a layout plan of the template you will use for your zine.
    • Your layout plan should show how you will organise the text and content across the eight surfaces of the zine.
    • Check that the text and page layout is appropriate to the folding format of your zine.
  • Create two concepts for possible covers for your zine.

Step 2: Develop your ideas

  • Reflect on and refine the strongest features of your work so far. Use your most successful ideas to create the final page designs for your zine.
  • Use appropriate processes, materials, and techniques to incorporate type and image.

Step 3: Produce your resolved zine

  • Produce a resolved zine that shows skilled management of production process and procedures.
  • Print it as an A3 page and then fold and construct your final zine. (You can practice making this first with a blank piece of paper, following zine folding instructions.)
    • Your final submission must include some evidence that shows your research and development (decision making). This evidence can be taken from the work you did to plan and develop your zine.

You are going to produce a resolved zine that includes a whakataukī or kupu Māori to visually communicate your personal relationship with a site of historical significance.

A resolved artwork is a single significant artwork. It is the most effective communication of an idea or narrative with the appropriate technical finish.

Before starting this Assessment Activity, you will:

  • visit a site of historical significance
  • generate a wide range of visual resources to work with when you create your zine
  • select a whakataukī/whaktauākī or kupu Māori that reflects your personal relationship with the site
  • explore typography, photographic, and drawing imagery
  • explore zine processes, materials and techniques.

See Getting Started and Student Resources for guidance.

Assessment Activity: Resolved zine

Zine size — one A3 page (approximately 165mm x 210mm) folded into eight.

Use the most successful designs from your in-class experiments to develop and produce your final zine.

Step 1: Plan your zine

  • Identify the key conventions of zines and select the processes, materials, and techniques you will use.
  • Create a layout plan of the template you will use for your zine.
    • Your layout plan should show how you will organise the text and content across the eight surfaces of the zine.
    • Check that the text and page layout is appropriate to the folding format of your zine.
  • Create two concepts for possible covers for your zine.

Step 2: Develop your ideas

  • Reflect on and refine the strongest features of your work so far. Use your most successful ideas to create the final page designs for your zine.
  • Use appropriate processes, materials, and techniques to incorporate type and image.

Step 3: Produce your resolved zine

  • Produce a resolved zine that shows skilled management of production process and procedures.
  • Print it as an A3 page and then fold and construct your final zine. (You can practice making this first with a blank piece of paper, following zine folding instructions.)
    • Your final submission must include some evidence that shows your research and development (decision making). This evidence can be taken from the work you did to plan and develop your zine.

How to present your learning

The outcome will be one A3 page (including images and text), folded and constructed into a zine. The folded zine size is 165mm x 210mm.

You must also submit supporting evidence that shows the research and development (decision-making) involved in producing the artwork. This evidence is not directly assessed, however it is necessary to show intentionality and inform the resolved artwork.

You might include:

  • your photographic imagery, notes, and drawings from the site
  • investigation of established design practice
  • typography experiments using ideas from your established practice investigation
  • modified drawing and photographic images and typography experiments
  • zine concepts for covers
  • developments for final zine
  • design works which experiment with combining selected typography experiments.

The outcome will be one A3 page (including images and text), folded and constructed into a zine. The folded zine size is 165mm x 210mm.

You must also submit supporting evidence that shows the research and development (decision-making) involved in producing the artwork. This evidence is not directly assessed, however it is necessary to show intentionality and inform the resolved artwork.

You might include:

  • your photographic imagery, notes, and drawings from the site
  • investigation of established design practice
  • typography experiments using ideas from your established practice investigation
  • modified drawing and photographic images and typography experiments
  • zine concepts for covers
  • developments for final zine
  • design works which experiment with combining selected typography experiments.

Timeframe

Your teacher will provide details of:

  • planning and preparation (approximately 30 hours of class time)
  • final resolved zine (approximately 10 hours of class time).

Your teacher will provide details of:

  • planning and preparation (approximately 30 hours of class time)
  • final resolved zine (approximately 10 hours of class time).

Getting started

This Assessment Activity combines multiple skills and ideas in a resolved artwork.

Before you start the final artwork, you will need to:

  • select a local site of historical significance to visit (where possible)
  • generate photographic and drawing imagery
  • investigate typographic design and zine conventions
  • consider your personal relationship with the site through whakataukī/whakatauākī or kupu Māori that relate to ideas of the whenua.

Below are suggested activities you could do to develop your skills and ideas before you begin the final Assessment Activity.

Suggested preparation:

Visit a site and generate resource imagery

As a class, visit a local site of historical significance.

At the site you could:

  • generate a wide range of visual resources so you have plenty of material to work with
  • take photos and document the site using a range of photographic conventions and visual art processes
  • consider whakataukī/whaktauākī or kupu Māori that relate to ideas of the whenua at the site you have visited. Use these ideas to inform the imagery you gather.

Typography research

a) Look at established practice in Aotearoa New Zealand

Look at established practice and research artists who work with conventions using type. See student resources for a list of artists.

Think about what you can learn from these artists and how it could influence your zine. Attach two examples of their work onto an A3 page and annotate their work.

b) Look at established international practice

Select one or two designers or designs styles from an international context to research. See student resource for a list of artists.

On an A3 page attach examples of their work and make brief annotations about the conventions they have used and how you could apply these to your zine.

Whakataukī in typography

Look at selected whakataukī/whaktauākī or kupu Māori that relate to ideas of the whenua or your own culture. Develop your ideas from this, and explain your connection to your space or site.

You could do this by:

  • selecting a whakataukī/whakatauākī that has meaning to you
  • making notes about what you think this means in relation to the site and yourself
  • experimenting with expressive ways you can use typography to communicate your whakataukī/whakatauākī and the ideas behind it.

Experimenting with type using a range of hand-made or digital processes. (Consider the conventions you looked at in your research.)

This Assessment Activity combines multiple skills and ideas in a resolved artwork.

Before you start the final artwork, you will need to:

  • select a local site of historical significance to visit (where possible)
  • generate photographic and drawing imagery
  • investigate typographic design and zine conventions
  • consider your personal relationship with the site through whakataukī/whakatauākī or kupu Māori that relate to ideas of the whenua.

Below are suggested activities you could do to develop your skills and ideas before you begin the final Assessment Activity.

Suggested preparation:

Visit a site and generate resource imagery

As a class, visit a local site of historical significance.

At the site you could:

  • generate a wide range of visual resources so you have plenty of material to work with
  • take photos and document the site using a range of photographic conventions and visual art processes
  • consider whakataukī/whaktauākī or kupu Māori that relate to ideas of the whenua at the site you have visited. Use these ideas to inform the imagery you gather.

Typography research

a) Look at established practice in Aotearoa New Zealand

Look at established practice and research artists who work with conventions using type. See student resources for a list of artists.

Think about what you can learn from these artists and how it could influence your zine. Attach two examples of their work onto an A3 page and annotate their work.

b) Look at established international practice

Select one or two designers or designs styles from an international context to research. See student resource for a list of artists.

On an A3 page attach examples of their work and make brief annotations about the conventions they have used and how you could apply these to your zine.

Whakataukī in typography

Look at selected whakataukī/whaktauākī or kupu Māori that relate to ideas of the whenua or your own culture. Develop your ideas from this, and explain your connection to your space or site.

You could do this by:

  • selecting a whakataukī/whakatauākī that has meaning to you
  • making notes about what you think this means in relation to the site and yourself
  • experimenting with expressive ways you can use typography to communicate your whakataukī/whakatauākī and the ideas behind it.

Experimenting with type using a range of hand-made or digital processes. (Consider the conventions you looked at in your research.)

Student resources

A zine is a non-commercial magazine-like publication. It uses imagery, text, formatting, and layout to communicate subject matter and self-expression. Unlike a book, the images in a zine do not have to end on the page, they can be continuous and wrap the publication, or they can be sectioned. Consideration can be given to how the zine will look both folded and unfolded.

Note: You may use images gathered from Achievement Standard 91912 and use class resources provided by the teacher along with images generated from your site visit.

Examples of information to gather on your site visit:

  • information about the environment such as:
    • textures (leaves, grass, tree branches, sand)
    • natural patterns (waves, grass, wood)
    • surrounding landscape (hills, horizon, sea)
    • atmospheric (light, clouds)
  • recordings of text elements such as:
    • street signs, information on signs or monuments.

Photographic conventions used to document a site could include:

  • wide-angle lens, establishing shots of the landscape, scenery, horizons, mountains, cliffs, land, ocean, trails, tracks
  • capturing objects within the site (trees, buildings, hills, people, animals, shells)
  • close-ups (leaves, sections of trees, buildings, hills)
  • panoramas.

Visual Art conventions used to record the environment could include:

  • drawings, observational notes, rubbings (frottage), or any other appropriate methods.

Questions you could ask when analysing examples of established practice:

  • What typographic conventions have they used? How have they used these conventions (for example, font types, size, angles, upper or lower case, colour, layering or overlapping, text hierarchy)?
  • What processes, materials, and techniques did they use to produce the work?
  • What is the meaning and interpretation of the work?
  • What ideas might I use in my work? What images have I already made that I can use?

Techniques for experimenting with typography and imagery examples include:

  • desaturating or saturating images
  • opacity and blending layers of images and type
  • creating visual spaces for type over images.

Combining whakataukī and imagery

Extend your ideas about your whakataukī/whakatauākī by combining your type experiments with imagery (drawings, mark making, photographs). Explore the idea of language being a mark.

  • Using ideas from your investigation of artists, generate a series of four A4 sized design works which combine selected typography experiments with your imagery from the site, cyanotype prints, and expressive mark making techniques.
  • Select the ideas and art making conventions that you would like to use when you make your zine.

A zine is a non-commercial magazine-like publication. It uses imagery, text, formatting, and layout to communicate subject matter and self-expression. Unlike a book, the images in a zine do not have to end on the page, they can be continuous and wrap the publication, or they can be sectioned. Consideration can be given to how the zine will look both folded and unfolded.

Note: You may use images gathered from Achievement Standard 91912 and use class resources provided by the teacher along with images generated from your site visit.

Examples of information to gather on your site visit:

  • information about the environment such as:
    • textures (leaves, grass, tree branches, sand)
    • natural patterns (waves, grass, wood)
    • surrounding landscape (hills, horizon, sea)
    • atmospheric (light, clouds)
  • recordings of text elements such as:
    • street signs, information on signs or monuments.

Photographic conventions used to document a site could include:

  • wide-angle lens, establishing shots of the landscape, scenery, horizons, mountains, cliffs, land, ocean, trails, tracks
  • capturing objects within the site (trees, buildings, hills, people, animals, shells)
  • close-ups (leaves, sections of trees, buildings, hills)
  • panoramas.

Visual Art conventions used to record the environment could include:

  • drawings, observational notes, rubbings (frottage), or any other appropriate methods.

Questions you could ask when analysing examples of established practice:

  • What typographic conventions have they used? How have they used these conventions (for example, font types, size, angles, upper or lower case, colour, layering or overlapping, text hierarchy)?
  • What processes, materials, and techniques did they use to produce the work?
  • What is the meaning and interpretation of the work?
  • What ideas might I use in my work? What images have I already made that I can use?

Techniques for experimenting with typography and imagery examples include:

  • desaturating or saturating images
  • opacity and blending layers of images and type
  • creating visual spaces for type over images.

Combining whakataukī and imagery

Extend your ideas about your whakataukī/whakatauākī by combining your type experiments with imagery (drawings, mark making, photographs). Explore the idea of language being a mark.

  • Using ideas from your investigation of artists, generate a series of four A4 sized design works which combine selected typography experiments with your imagery from the site, cyanotype prints, and expressive mark making techniques.
  • Select the ideas and art making conventions that you would like to use when you make your zine.