Understanding How NCEA Requirements Are Changing

Over the next few years, NCEA will transition from its current form into the new qualification. Here is what you need to know about transitioning to the new NCEA requirements. Although this information is intended for teachers, we encourage learners and whānau to use this guidance as well.

Over the next few years, NCEA will transition from its current form into the new qualification. Here is what you need to know about transitioning to the new NCEA requirements. Although this information is intended for teachers, we encourage learners and whānau to use this guidance as well.

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Key Information

New standards that will directly assess foundational Te Reo Matatini me te Pāngarau | Literacy and Numeracy will become mandatory corequisites to NCEA in 2024. This means that students need to achieve the new standards to be awarded their NCEA qualification at any level.

The standards are levelled at Level 4/5 of the National Curriculum whereby students have control of Level 4 and are ready to work at Level 5. This reflects internationally agreed measures for the foundational skills that support learning, life, and work.

The mandatory introduction of the new NCEA literacy and numeracy standards will occur at the same time as new standards for NCEA Level 1 are rolled out as part of the Review of Achievement Standards. This is also when all levels of NCEA will change from an 80-credit to a 60-credit qualification. Learners will only be able to receive the 60credit qualification if they have achieved the corequisites, or have achieved current literacy and numeracy requirements before the end of 2023.

In 2024:

  • NCEA will reduce in size from an 80-credit qualification to a 60-credit qualification for Level 1, Level 2 and Level 3. Learners will only be able to receive this qualification if they have achieved the corequisites, or the current literacy and numeracy requirements before the end of 2023. The current practice to ‘carry over’ 20 credits of Level 1 credits into Level 2 and 20 Level 2 credits into Level 3 will cease.

  • The new NCEA Level 1 Achievement Standards will be fully implemented. The new NCEA Level 2 Achievement Standards will be implemented in 2025, and the new NCEA Level 3 Achievement Standards in 2026.

  • The new Te Reo Matatini me te Pāngarau | Literacy and Numeracy corequisite standards will become mandatory for Level 1, Level 2 and Level 3.

  • The Review of Achievement Standards has been rephased so that the new Level 1 Achievement Standards will be fully implemented in 2024, the new Level 2 Achievement Standards in 2025, and the new Level 3 Achievement Standards in 2026. This will not affect the corequisite and credit requirements.

New standards that will directly assess foundational Te Reo Matatini me te Pāngarau | Literacy and Numeracy will become mandatory corequisites to NCEA in 2024. This means that students need to achieve the new standards to be awarded their NCEA qualification at any level.

The standards are levelled at Level 4/5 of the National Curriculum whereby students have control of Level 4 and are ready to work at Level 5. This reflects internationally agreed measures for the foundational skills that support learning, life, and work.

The mandatory introduction of the new NCEA literacy and numeracy standards will occur at the same time as new standards for NCEA Level 1 are rolled out as part of the Review of Achievement Standards. This is also when all levels of NCEA will change from an 80-credit to a 60-credit qualification. Learners will only be able to receive the 60credit qualification if they have achieved the corequisites, or have achieved current literacy and numeracy requirements before the end of 2023.

In 2024:

  • NCEA will reduce in size from an 80-credit qualification to a 60-credit qualification for Level 1, Level 2 and Level 3. Learners will only be able to receive this qualification if they have achieved the corequisites, or the current literacy and numeracy requirements before the end of 2023. The current practice to ‘carry over’ 20 credits of Level 1 credits into Level 2 and 20 Level 2 credits into Level 3 will cease.

  • The new NCEA Level 1 Achievement Standards will be fully implemented. The new NCEA Level 2 Achievement Standards will be implemented in 2025, and the new NCEA Level 3 Achievement Standards in 2026.

  • The new Te Reo Matatini me te Pāngarau | Literacy and Numeracy corequisite standards will become mandatory for Level 1, Level 2 and Level 3.

  • The Review of Achievement Standards has been rephased so that the new Level 1 Achievement Standards will be fully implemented in 2024, the new Level 2 Achievement Standards in 2025, and the new Level 3 Achievement Standards in 2026. This will not affect the corequisite and credit requirements.

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NCEA as a 60-Credit Qualification

Under the new NCEA:   

  • Each level of NCEA will reduce in size from an 80-credit qualification to a 60-credit qualification.   

  • Learners need to achieve 20 credits from new standards relating to Te Reo Matatini, Pāngarau, Literacy, and Numeracy. The 20 credits achieved from these standards are separate from the 60 credits needed to achieve each level of NCEA.     

Any credits learners already have at the appropriate level can be used to meet the new requirements. Learners can use Unit Standards as well as Achievement Standards to meet the 60 credits required for each level of NCEA. Skills Standards set by Workforce Development Councils will also be able to be used towards an NCEA.  

There is no time limit on completing the 60-credit qualification. If learners gain part of their qualification, they can return to study at any time. 

Under the new NCEA:   

  • Each level of NCEA will reduce in size from an 80-credit qualification to a 60-credit qualification.   

  • Learners need to achieve 20 credits from new standards relating to Te Reo Matatini, Pāngarau, Literacy, and Numeracy. The 20 credits achieved from these standards are separate from the 60 credits needed to achieve each level of NCEA.     

Any credits learners already have at the appropriate level can be used to meet the new requirements. Learners can use Unit Standards as well as Achievement Standards to meet the 60 credits required for each level of NCEA. Skills Standards set by Workforce Development Councils will also be able to be used towards an NCEA.  

There is no time limit on completing the 60-credit qualification. If learners gain part of their qualification, they can return to study at any time. 

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Creating Courses Using New NCEA Achievement Standards

All NCEA subjects and wāhanga ako are being re-built with four Achievement Standards – 2 internally assessed, 2 externally assessed – worth 20 credits in total. Schools will still be free to design courses that use Achievement Standards from across two or more NCEA subjects. However, during piloting years, schools must deliver courses that use all four Achievement Standards. 

To be eligible for course endorsement, students must gain 14 or more credits from a single course, with at least one externally assessed standard achieved.

All NCEA subjects and wāhanga ako are being re-built with four Achievement Standards – 2 internally assessed, 2 externally assessed – worth 20 credits in total. Schools will still be free to design courses that use Achievement Standards from across two or more NCEA subjects. However, during piloting years, schools must deliver courses that use all four Achievement Standards. 

To be eligible for course endorsement, students must gain 14 or more credits from a single course, with at least one externally assessed standard achieved.

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Te Reo Matatini me te Pāngarau | Literacy and Numeracy Co-requisite

The new Te Reo Matatini me te Pāngarau | Literacy and Numeracy standards will become mandatory corequisites to NCEA in 2024. The new standards assess learners on important foundational skills that will help them succeed in NCEA, further learning, life, and work.   

To achieve the corequisite, learners need to achieve:   

  1. 10 credits from either the Te Reo Matatini OR Literacy standards          

AND

  1.  10 credits from either the Pāngarau OR Numeracy standard     

The standards are available to learners from Year 9 onwards and are at Level 4/5 of the curriculum. Teachers will help learners to know when they are ready to be assessed against the standards.

Learners can work towards the corequisite at the same time as they work towards the 60 credits needed for each level of NCEA. But they need to achieve the new standards to be awarded their formal NCEA qualification at any level. Students will be able to contribute towards a Record of Achievement without having yet achieved the corequisite standards.

Transition Arrangements for Te Reo Matatini me te Pāngarau | Literacy and Numeracy

This section outlines the transition from the current literacy and numeracy requirements to the new corequisites.

2022 and 2023

New Zealand Curriculum NCEA Level 1 and Te Ao Haka pilot schools and kura

In 2022 and 2023, some schools and kura will be piloting Te Ao Haka and new New Zealand Curriculum NCEA Level 1 subjects. These schools and kura can meet the literacy and numeracy requirements during this time through:

  • The current requirements – this includes either using standards on a list of specified assessment standards or a package of three literacy and three numeracy unit standards. More information is on the NZQA website.

  • In 2022, if the school or kura is also participating in the Te Reo Matatini me te Pāngarau | Literacy and Numeracy pilot, they can use these standards to meet the literacy and numeracy requirement.

  • In 2023, any school and kura can choose to use the Te Reo Matatini me te Pāngarau | Literacy and Numeracy standards to meet the literacy and numeracy requirement.

  • In 2022 and 2023, pilot schools can use Te Ao Haka and Level 1 Achievement Standards that they are piloting if they have been tagged to meet the current literacy and numeracy requirements. Download a list of these tagged standards:

The new Te Reo Matatini me te Pāngarau | Literacy and Numeracy standards will become mandatory corequisites to NCEA in 2024. The new standards assess learners on important foundational skills that will help them succeed in NCEA, further learning, life, and work.   

To achieve the corequisite, learners need to achieve:   

  1. 10 credits from either the Te Reo Matatini OR Literacy standards          

AND

  1.  10 credits from either the Pāngarau OR Numeracy standard     

The standards are available to learners from Year 9 onwards and are at Level 4/5 of the curriculum. Teachers will help learners to know when they are ready to be assessed against the standards.

Learners can work towards the corequisite at the same time as they work towards the 60 credits needed for each level of NCEA. But they need to achieve the new standards to be awarded their formal NCEA qualification at any level. Students will be able to contribute towards a Record of Achievement without having yet achieved the corequisite standards.

Transition Arrangements for Te Reo Matatini me te Pāngarau | Literacy and Numeracy

This section outlines the transition from the current literacy and numeracy requirements to the new corequisites.

2022 and 2023

New Zealand Curriculum NCEA Level 1 and Te Ao Haka pilot schools and kura

In 2022 and 2023, some schools and kura will be piloting Te Ao Haka and new New Zealand Curriculum NCEA Level 1 subjects. These schools and kura can meet the literacy and numeracy requirements during this time through:

  • The current requirements – this includes either using standards on a list of specified assessment standards or a package of three literacy and three numeracy unit standards. More information is on the NZQA website.

  • In 2022, if the school or kura is also participating in the Te Reo Matatini me te Pāngarau | Literacy and Numeracy pilot, they can use these standards to meet the literacy and numeracy requirement.

  • In 2023, any school and kura can choose to use the Te Reo Matatini me te Pāngarau | Literacy and Numeracy standards to meet the literacy and numeracy requirement.

  • In 2022 and 2023, pilot schools can use Te Ao Haka and Level 1 Achievement Standards that they are piloting if they have been tagged to meet the current literacy and numeracy requirements. Download a list of these tagged standards:

[ File Resource ]

  • Title: List of Tagged Standards
  • Description: List of Tagged Pilot Achievement Standards
  • File URL: https://ncea-live-3-storagestack-53q-assetstorages3bucket-2o21xte0r81u.s3.amazonaws.com/s3fs-public/2022-07/List_of_Tagged_Standards.pdf?VersionId=h_6PePFlHR0y9axTcgoyspZScsQyH1kM
  • File Extension: pdf
  • File Size: 278KB

Download
Download

List of Tagged Standards

List of Tagged Pilot Achievement Standards
List of Tagged Pilot Achievement Standards

Te Reo Matatini me te Pāngarau | Literacy and Numeracy standards are treated separately to one another. This means it is possible for a learner to gain the literacy requirement through one of the above while the numeracy requirement can be gained through a separate option (for example, through a maths standard).

The list of tagged standards will be published on NZQA’s website. We will review each new standard from The New Zealand Curriculum and Te Marautanga o Aotearoa as they are completed to support the pilot schools and kura.

Schools and Kura that are not participating in pilots

Schools and kura that are not participating in NCEA pilots in 2022 and 2023 can meet the literacy and numeracy requirements during this time through:

  • The current process – this includes either using standards on a list of specified assessment standards or a package of three literacy and three numeracy unit standards. More information is on the NZQA website.

  • In 2022, if a school or kura is also participating in Te Reo Matatini me te Pāngarau | Literacy and Numeracy pilot, they can use these standards to meet the literacy and numeracy requirement.

  • In 2023, any school and kura can choose to use Te Reo Matatini me te Pāngarau | Literacy and Numeracy standards to meet the literacy and numeracy requirement.

NCEA Pāngarau | Numeracy & UE Numeracy

The numeracy requirements for University Entrance (UE) are currently the same as those for NCEA – 10 numeracy-rich credits at NCEA Level 1 or above, made up of either:

  1. specified achievement standards, available through a range of subjects; or

  2. a package of three numeracy unit standards (26623, 26626, 26627 - where all three standards are required).

In keeping with this equivalence, learners who successfully complete the new pāngarau or numeracy unit standards during the 2022 pilot or 2023 transition year will be able to use these 10 pāngarau | numeracy credits to fulfil the numeracy requirement for the award of UE in 2022 and 2023.

This provisional arrangement aims to ensure that learners working towards receiving UE in 2022 and 2023 will not be disadvantaged by completing the new pāngarau | numeracy standards.

In partnership with NZQA, we will revaluate this arrangement ahead of the mandatory implementation of the corequisite in 2024.

2024 and Beyond

In 2024, Te Reo Matatini me te Pāngarau | Literacy and Numeracy corequisites will be the only way a learner can meet the NCEA literacy and numeracy requirements.

If learners achieve the literacy or numeracy requirement before the new achievement standards are phased through, this achievement will be recognised towards the new corequisite. Learners will have until the end of 2026 for this recognition, giving learners a three-year grace period.

We expect these transition arrangements will also apply to NCEA qualifications delivered in tertiary and alternative education settings. However, final decisions on additional transition arrangements for these programmes have yet to be confirmed.

Additional Information

Frequently Asked Questions on the Te Reo Matatini me Te Pāngarau | Literacy and Numeracy change and pilot years

Te Reo Matatini me te Pāngarau | Literacy and Numeracy standards are treated separately to one another. This means it is possible for a learner to gain the literacy requirement through one of the above while the numeracy requirement can be gained through a separate option (for example, through a maths standard).

The list of tagged standards will be published on NZQA’s website. We will review each new standard from The New Zealand Curriculum and Te Marautanga o Aotearoa as they are completed to support the pilot schools and kura.

Schools and Kura that are not participating in pilots

Schools and kura that are not participating in NCEA pilots in 2022 and 2023 can meet the literacy and numeracy requirements during this time through:

  • The current process – this includes either using standards on a list of specified assessment standards or a package of three literacy and three numeracy unit standards. More information is on the NZQA website.

  • In 2022, if a school or kura is also participating in Te Reo Matatini me te Pāngarau | Literacy and Numeracy pilot, they can use these standards to meet the literacy and numeracy requirement.

  • In 2023, any school and kura can choose to use Te Reo Matatini me te Pāngarau | Literacy and Numeracy standards to meet the literacy and numeracy requirement.

NCEA Pāngarau | Numeracy & UE Numeracy

The numeracy requirements for University Entrance (UE) are currently the same as those for NCEA – 10 numeracy-rich credits at NCEA Level 1 or above, made up of either:

  1. specified achievement standards, available through a range of subjects; or

  2. a package of three numeracy unit standards (26623, 26626, 26627 - where all three standards are required).

In keeping with this equivalence, learners who successfully complete the new pāngarau or numeracy unit standards during the 2022 pilot or 2023 transition year will be able to use these 10 pāngarau | numeracy credits to fulfil the numeracy requirement for the award of UE in 2022 and 2023.

This provisional arrangement aims to ensure that learners working towards receiving UE in 2022 and 2023 will not be disadvantaged by completing the new pāngarau | numeracy standards.

In partnership with NZQA, we will revaluate this arrangement ahead of the mandatory implementation of the corequisite in 2024.

2024 and Beyond

In 2024, Te Reo Matatini me te Pāngarau | Literacy and Numeracy corequisites will be the only way a learner can meet the NCEA literacy and numeracy requirements.

If learners achieve the literacy or numeracy requirement before the new achievement standards are phased through, this achievement will be recognised towards the new corequisite. Learners will have until the end of 2026 for this recognition, giving learners a three-year grace period.

We expect these transition arrangements will also apply to NCEA qualifications delivered in tertiary and alternative education settings. However, final decisions on additional transition arrangements for these programmes have yet to be confirmed.

Additional Information

Frequently Asked Questions on the Te Reo Matatini me Te Pāngarau | Literacy and Numeracy change and pilot years

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Exclusions

The only time that a learner cannot use a standard towards an NCEA qualification is if they have already achieved a standard where the learning significantly overlaps. The term for this is an exclusion. As we develop new Achievement Standards, we will publish information about any exclusions.

Exclusions are important for:

  • encouraging broad and foundational coverage of the curriculum. Assessing the same learning outcome twice is likely to be at the expense of deeper, richer teaching and learning.

  • promoting the delivery of coherent packages of learning. Assessing the same learning outcome twice is unlikely to provide as coherent or complete coverage of a subject or learning area as teaching towards and assessing two or more separate but related learning outcomes.

  • reducing teacher and student workload. Students should not be assessed twice on the same learning outcome, and teachers should not have to mark work towards the same learning outcome twice, with the notable exception of resubmissions.

  • ensuring the robustness of the qualification. Double dipping undermines and devalues the outcome statement of an NCEA. In most cases, new NCEA standards are excluded against existing standards in each subject. See the exclusions list for the new NCEA Level 1 pilot standards.

A learner cannot use a standard to meet both the 60-credit requirement and Te Reo Matatini me te Pāngarau | Literacy and Numeracy corequisites. For example, if a learner uses an Achievement Standard in History towards the literacy and numeracy corequisite, they cannot use it towards the 60-credit requirement as well.

The following table lists the standards excluded from the new literacy and numeracy standards.

 
  NEW LITERACY AND NUMERACY STANDARDS   CURRENT UNIT STANDARDS
EITHER Literacy (reading) US32403, 5 credits OR Reading US26624, 3 credits
EITHER Literacy (writing) US32405, 5 credits OR Writing US26622, 4 credits
EITHER Numeracy US32406, 10 credits OR Numeracy: number US26623, 4 credits, statistics US26626, 3 credits or measurement US26627, 3 credits

Table 2

The only time that a learner cannot use a standard towards an NCEA qualification is if they have already achieved a standard where the learning significantly overlaps. The term for this is an exclusion. As we develop new Achievement Standards, we will publish information about any exclusions.

Exclusions are important for:

  • encouraging broad and foundational coverage of the curriculum. Assessing the same learning outcome twice is likely to be at the expense of deeper, richer teaching and learning.

  • promoting the delivery of coherent packages of learning. Assessing the same learning outcome twice is unlikely to provide as coherent or complete coverage of a subject or learning area as teaching towards and assessing two or more separate but related learning outcomes.

  • reducing teacher and student workload. Students should not be assessed twice on the same learning outcome, and teachers should not have to mark work towards the same learning outcome twice, with the notable exception of resubmissions.

  • ensuring the robustness of the qualification. Double dipping undermines and devalues the outcome statement of an NCEA. In most cases, new NCEA standards are excluded against existing standards in each subject. See the exclusions list for the new NCEA Level 1 pilot standards.

A learner cannot use a standard to meet both the 60-credit requirement and Te Reo Matatini me te Pāngarau | Literacy and Numeracy corequisites. For example, if a learner uses an Achievement Standard in History towards the literacy and numeracy corequisite, they cannot use it towards the 60-credit requirement as well.

The following table lists the standards excluded from the new literacy and numeracy standards.

 
  NEW LITERACY AND NUMERACY STANDARDS   CURRENT UNIT STANDARDS
EITHER Literacy (reading) US32403, 5 credits OR Reading US26624, 3 credits
EITHER Literacy (writing) US32405, 5 credits OR Writing US26622, 4 credits
EITHER Numeracy US32406, 10 credits OR Numeracy: number US26623, 4 credits, statistics US26626, 3 credits or measurement US26627, 3 credits

Table 2