What to do

You are going to produce a resolved paint or sculptural installation designed for a specific location that visually communicates identity and culture, connecting people and place. 

A resolved artwork is a single significant artwork. It is the most effective communication of an idea or narrative with the appropriate technical finish.

Before starting this Assessment Activity, you will: 

  • visit a site of your choosing 
  • spend time developing your own personal perspective on the idea of "Portrayals of our people"
  • generate a wide range of visual resources to work with when you create your installation
  • explore painting and sculpture processes, materials and techniques. 

 See Getting Started and Student Resources for guidance. 
 
Assessment Activity: Resolved installation 

Paint or sculptural installation size — appropriate in scale and media to chosen location.  

Use the most successful outcomes from your in-class experiments to develop and produce your paint or sculptural installation. 

Step 1: Plan your installation 

  • Identify the key conventions of sculpture or paint and select the processes, materials, and techniques to use in your installation. 
  • Select a person to portray in your work and create a mind-map that identifies key cultural concepts and information related to this person and the site of your installation. 
  • Select images generated from your work around your site and your person that effectively portray a narrative around your person and site. 
  • Select techniques and conventions that communicate your relationship with the site. 
  • Draft a series (at least 4) paint or sculptural concepts for your installation. These may include rough sketches, working over photos of your site, mock-ups and maquettes. 

Step 2: Develop your ideas 

  • Reflect on and refine the strongest features of your work so far. Use your most successful concepts to create a final design/plan/concept/mock-up for your installation. 
  • Refine your use of relevant paint or sculpture processes, materials or techniques you will be using to produce your final installation. 

Step 3: Produce your resolved installation 

  • Produce a resolved installation that shows skilled management of related paint or sculptural production process and procedures. 
  • Create your final installation in its intended location. If you cannot produce your final due to scale, resource, or access constraints, produce a scaled-down marquette and present it with a collaged photo to represent it in its intended location.

Your final submission must include some evidence that shows your research and development (decision making). This evidence can be taken from the work you did to plan and develop your installation.

You are going to produce a resolved paint or sculptural installation designed for a specific location that visually communicates identity and culture, connecting people and place. 

A resolved artwork is a single significant artwork. It is the most effective communication of an idea or narrative with the appropriate technical finish.

Before starting this Assessment Activity, you will: 

  • visit a site of your choosing 
  • spend time developing your own personal perspective on the idea of "Portrayals of our people"
  • generate a wide range of visual resources to work with when you create your installation
  • explore painting and sculpture processes, materials and techniques. 

 See Getting Started and Student Resources for guidance. 
 
Assessment Activity: Resolved installation 

Paint or sculptural installation size — appropriate in scale and media to chosen location.  

Use the most successful outcomes from your in-class experiments to develop and produce your paint or sculptural installation. 

Step 1: Plan your installation 

  • Identify the key conventions of sculpture or paint and select the processes, materials, and techniques to use in your installation. 
  • Select a person to portray in your work and create a mind-map that identifies key cultural concepts and information related to this person and the site of your installation. 
  • Select images generated from your work around your site and your person that effectively portray a narrative around your person and site. 
  • Select techniques and conventions that communicate your relationship with the site. 
  • Draft a series (at least 4) paint or sculptural concepts for your installation. These may include rough sketches, working over photos of your site, mock-ups and maquettes. 

Step 2: Develop your ideas 

  • Reflect on and refine the strongest features of your work so far. Use your most successful concepts to create a final design/plan/concept/mock-up for your installation. 
  • Refine your use of relevant paint or sculpture processes, materials or techniques you will be using to produce your final installation. 

Step 3: Produce your resolved installation 

  • Produce a resolved installation that shows skilled management of related paint or sculptural production process and procedures. 
  • Create your final installation in its intended location. If you cannot produce your final due to scale, resource, or access constraints, produce a scaled-down marquette and present it with a collaged photo to represent it in its intended location.

Your final submission must include some evidence that shows your research and development (decision making). This evidence can be taken from the work you did to plan and develop your installation.

How to present your learning

The outcome will be a resolved paint or sculptural installation in a specific location, or a marquette with a collaged photo to represent it in its intended location. 

You must submit supporting evidence that shows the research and development (decision-making) involved in producing the artwork. The evidence is not directly assessed, however it is necessary to show intentionality and inform the resolved artwork. 

You might include: 

  • imagery, notes, and drawings from the site 
  • investigation of established practice related to the relevant artmaking you have selected 
  • mind-map and visual research into chosen person
  • evidence of trialing and refining use of relevant paint or sculptural processes, materials, and techniques  
  • design/plan/concept/mock-up of final installation (paper or digital).

The outcome will be a resolved paint or sculptural installation in a specific location, or a marquette with a collaged photo to represent it in its intended location. 

You must submit supporting evidence that shows the research and development (decision-making) involved in producing the artwork. The evidence is not directly assessed, however it is necessary to show intentionality and inform the resolved artwork. 

You might include: 

  • imagery, notes, and drawings from the site 
  • investigation of established practice related to the relevant artmaking you have selected 
  • mind-map and visual research into chosen person
  • evidence of trialing and refining use of relevant paint or sculptural processes, materials, and techniques  
  • design/plan/concept/mock-up of final installation (paper or digital).

Timeframe

Your teacher will provide details of:

  • planning and preparation (approximately 30 hours of class time)
  • final resolved installation (approximately 10 hours of class time).

Your teacher will provide details of:

  • planning and preparation (approximately 30 hours of class time)
  • final resolved installation (approximately 10 hours of class time).

Getting started

This Assessment Activity combines multiple skills and ideas in a resolved artwork. 

Before you start the final artwork, you will need to: 

  • select a site and person to portray that holds significance to you: socially, historically, culturally, personally, your community 
  • generate a range of imagery from the site and of your person
  • investigate established art making conventions you will use in your installation 
  • develop an idea or narrative that you will communicate through your artwork. 

Below are suggested activities you could do to develop your skills and ideas before you begin the final Assessment Activity. 

Suggested preparation: 

Visit a site and generate resource imagery 

Think about/discuss: 

  • culture and identity, the correlation of the two and how these are expressed visually in public artworks 
  • developing your own perspective on how cultural identity is portrayed in local sites (for example, marae, Polyfest, Tāmaki Makaurau Kapa Haka Regionals, church, Mangere Maunga, Ihumātao, school, home, shopping centre, local street or park, night markets). 

Site investigation 

You are to decide on a site that would be appropriate for a paint or sculptural installation. The site should have significance to you and/or your local community. 

Visit the site individually, in pairs, groups, or as a class. Photograph the site from at least six different perspectives or angles (or both). 

Investigating person and context 

a) Decide on who you would like to appear in your painting or installation. This person should have significance to the site and/or to you and/or your community.  

For example: chiefs, kaumātua, leaders, community officials, or pioneers. These could include beings from the mythical or spiritual realm. 

b) Source photos or images of this person through a variety of sources — old photographs, museums, books, or digital resources.  Before using any images, you will need to check that you have permission. Depending on the image and who is in it, this could be from the subject of the image, the copyright holder of the image, or the cultural custodians of the image.

Investigating established practice 

Look at examples of established practice that show how artworks were created in relation to specific sites, places, or concepts. Look at the strategies for combining text and image.

On an A3 page attach examples of their work and make brief annotations about the conventions they have used and how you will apply these to your book. 

You should outline: 

  • the ways you will link the site to the key concepts you will use in your installation 
  • how and why these concepts relate to the selected site 
  • how and why these concepts relate to your person. 

Public vs private space 

Discuss, compare, and contrast what type of artworks we see in public or private spaces. Who is the primary audience and secondary audience? 

  • Aim to create an A4 photograph of the class activity with annotations presented on 1 x A3 page. 

This Assessment Activity combines multiple skills and ideas in a resolved artwork. 

Before you start the final artwork, you will need to: 

  • select a site and person to portray that holds significance to you: socially, historically, culturally, personally, your community 
  • generate a range of imagery from the site and of your person
  • investigate established art making conventions you will use in your installation 
  • develop an idea or narrative that you will communicate through your artwork. 

Below are suggested activities you could do to develop your skills and ideas before you begin the final Assessment Activity. 

Suggested preparation: 

Visit a site and generate resource imagery 

Think about/discuss: 

  • culture and identity, the correlation of the two and how these are expressed visually in public artworks 
  • developing your own perspective on how cultural identity is portrayed in local sites (for example, marae, Polyfest, Tāmaki Makaurau Kapa Haka Regionals, church, Mangere Maunga, Ihumātao, school, home, shopping centre, local street or park, night markets). 

Site investigation 

You are to decide on a site that would be appropriate for a paint or sculptural installation. The site should have significance to you and/or your local community. 

Visit the site individually, in pairs, groups, or as a class. Photograph the site from at least six different perspectives or angles (or both). 

Investigating person and context 

a) Decide on who you would like to appear in your painting or installation. This person should have significance to the site and/or to you and/or your community.  

For example: chiefs, kaumātua, leaders, community officials, or pioneers. These could include beings from the mythical or spiritual realm. 

b) Source photos or images of this person through a variety of sources — old photographs, museums, books, or digital resources.  Before using any images, you will need to check that you have permission. Depending on the image and who is in it, this could be from the subject of the image, the copyright holder of the image, or the cultural custodians of the image.

Investigating established practice 

Look at examples of established practice that show how artworks were created in relation to specific sites, places, or concepts. Look at the strategies for combining text and image.

On an A3 page attach examples of their work and make brief annotations about the conventions they have used and how you will apply these to your book. 

You should outline: 

  • the ways you will link the site to the key concepts you will use in your installation 
  • how and why these concepts relate to the selected site 
  • how and why these concepts relate to your person. 

Public vs private space 

Discuss, compare, and contrast what type of artworks we see in public or private spaces. Who is the primary audience and secondary audience? 

  • Aim to create an A4 photograph of the class activity with annotations presented on 1 x A3 page. 

Student resources

An installation is large-scale and can be mixed media. Installations can be designed for a specific space to create a dialogue between the artwork and its audience. Installations include the purposeful placement of objects or elements beyond the constraints of a flat surface. 

Note: You may use images gathered from Achievement Standard 91912 and use class resources provided by the teacher along with images generated from your site visit. 

Examples of information to gather on your site visit: 

  • record of the place/space the artwork is intended to be produced on such as wall, building, water tank 
  • information about the surrounding environment. 

Visual Art conventions used to document a site could include:  

  • sketches, washes, pen and ink, rubbings 
  • photographs and video that capture the site from a range of angles and perspectives 
  • observational notes and annotations.  

Questions you could ask when analysing examples of established practice:  

  • what painting or sculptural conventions have they used? How have they used these conventions (for example, scale, use of space, material, subject matter, narrative) 
  • what processes, materials, and techniques did they use to produce the work? 
  • what is the meaning and interpretation of the work? 
  • how were the works created in relation to specific sites, places, or concepts and how is this evident? 
  • what ideas might I use in my work? What images have I already made that I can use? 

Developing ideas mind-map: 

  • Who will be portrayed? 
  • How will they be portrayed? 
  • Is the narrative private or public? 
  • Who is the intended audience? 
  • Where is the appropriate place to install the work (public or private)? 
  • What is the outcome (paint or sculptural installation)? 

Examples of information to gather when researching your person: 

  • images of your person (photographs, paintings)  
  • images including photos or symbols related to the person in terms of personal, social, historical details 
  • copies of documents related to the person including quotes or references. 

Techniques you could use to plan your resolved installation: 

  • compositional studies/plans that combine the various visual elements you have recorded. These may include physical or digital collages. 
  • technical drawings that show the space or place (surface) your installation will appear as well as the finished concept/imagery 
  • physical or digital collages that show the space or place (surface) your installation will appear as well as the finished concept/imagery 
  • mock-ups, maquettes for your concepts against their intended setting (place and space). 

As part of you plans, you could consider and annotate: 

  • how the portrayed identity of the depicted person changes when integrated or juxtaposed against different locations 
  • what media you need for the final outcome and what skills 
  • how you will access your selected site.  

NOTE: If you cannot produce your final installation due to scale, resource or access constraints, you will need to create the work to scale, and display it in a way that references the site. You will need to digitally collage an image of your work onto an image of the site to show your intention.

An installation is large-scale and can be mixed media. Installations can be designed for a specific space to create a dialogue between the artwork and its audience. Installations include the purposeful placement of objects or elements beyond the constraints of a flat surface. 

Note: You may use images gathered from Achievement Standard 91912 and use class resources provided by the teacher along with images generated from your site visit. 

Examples of information to gather on your site visit: 

  • record of the place/space the artwork is intended to be produced on such as wall, building, water tank 
  • information about the surrounding environment. 

Visual Art conventions used to document a site could include:  

  • sketches, washes, pen and ink, rubbings 
  • photographs and video that capture the site from a range of angles and perspectives 
  • observational notes and annotations.  

Questions you could ask when analysing examples of established practice:  

  • what painting or sculptural conventions have they used? How have they used these conventions (for example, scale, use of space, material, subject matter, narrative) 
  • what processes, materials, and techniques did they use to produce the work? 
  • what is the meaning and interpretation of the work? 
  • how were the works created in relation to specific sites, places, or concepts and how is this evident? 
  • what ideas might I use in my work? What images have I already made that I can use? 

Developing ideas mind-map: 

  • Who will be portrayed? 
  • How will they be portrayed? 
  • Is the narrative private or public? 
  • Who is the intended audience? 
  • Where is the appropriate place to install the work (public or private)? 
  • What is the outcome (paint or sculptural installation)? 

Examples of information to gather when researching your person: 

  • images of your person (photographs, paintings)  
  • images including photos or symbols related to the person in terms of personal, social, historical details 
  • copies of documents related to the person including quotes or references. 

Techniques you could use to plan your resolved installation: 

  • compositional studies/plans that combine the various visual elements you have recorded. These may include physical or digital collages. 
  • technical drawings that show the space or place (surface) your installation will appear as well as the finished concept/imagery 
  • physical or digital collages that show the space or place (surface) your installation will appear as well as the finished concept/imagery 
  • mock-ups, maquettes for your concepts against their intended setting (place and space). 

As part of you plans, you could consider and annotate: 

  • how the portrayed identity of the depicted person changes when integrated or juxtaposed against different locations 
  • what media you need for the final outcome and what skills 
  • how you will access your selected site.  

NOTE: If you cannot produce your final installation due to scale, resource or access constraints, you will need to create the work to scale, and display it in a way that references the site. You will need to digitally collage an image of your work onto an image of the site to show your intention.