What to do

You are going to create a presentation to provide advice about the spread of kauri dieback disease.

Kauri dieback disease is caused by the microorganism Phytophthora, which affects native kauri trees.

This presentation needs to:

  • describe the process by which Phytophthora move
  • describe an abiotic or biotic factor that affects movement of Phytophthora
  • explain how the abiotic or biotic factor changes the movement of Phytophthora, increasing or decreasing the spread of the disease
  • analyse how changes in Phytophthora movement affects the species biodiversity of the forest environment, by examining data that shows difference in canopy cover of different areas or change to the forest over time.

You need to support your description of the abiotic or biotic factor within an interconnected environment with observations. Examples of observations may include primary data or secondary data. Your observations can come from practical activities that you’ve carried out in class. Practical activities could include:

  • an analysis of electron micrographs to show Phytopthora structures and processes involved in movement
  • investigations to explore how mould or mushroom spores spread as a model for fungi and slime moulds
  • modelling moisture, heat, or light requirements for fungal movement
  • an analysis of canopy cover surveys of areas with and without Phytophthora
  • a comparison of data showing plants or animals present in different areas over time
  • an analysis of data that links the presence of visitors to an area with Phytophthora damage
  • using data that shows a comparison of observations from another area, change over time, or findings from research.

You are going to create a presentation to provide advice about the spread of kauri dieback disease.

Kauri dieback disease is caused by the microorganism Phytophthora, which affects native kauri trees.

This presentation needs to:

  • describe the process by which Phytophthora move
  • describe an abiotic or biotic factor that affects movement of Phytophthora
  • explain how the abiotic or biotic factor changes the movement of Phytophthora, increasing or decreasing the spread of the disease
  • analyse how changes in Phytophthora movement affects the species biodiversity of the forest environment, by examining data that shows difference in canopy cover of different areas or change to the forest over time.

You need to support your description of the abiotic or biotic factor within an interconnected environment with observations. Examples of observations may include primary data or secondary data. Your observations can come from practical activities that you’ve carried out in class. Practical activities could include:

  • an analysis of electron micrographs to show Phytopthora structures and processes involved in movement
  • investigations to explore how mould or mushroom spores spread as a model for fungi and slime moulds
  • modelling moisture, heat, or light requirements for fungal movement
  • an analysis of canopy cover surveys of areas with and without Phytophthora
  • a comparison of data showing plants or animals present in different areas over time
  • an analysis of data that links the presence of visitors to an area with Phytophthora damage
  • using data that shows a comparison of observations from another area, change over time, or findings from research.

How to present your learning

Your findings could be presented in a variety of ways, such as: 

  • a digital or paper poster, infographic, or public service pamphlet, which will include detailed annotations alongside diagrams or pictures (up to 750-800 words)
  • a structured response (up to 750-800 words), with space to discuss what each observation shows about the relationship between microorganisms and their environment  
  • a video documentary to inform the target audience (three to four minutes) 
  • a slideshow (eight to ten slides) that will include text, detailed annotations, or a voiceover, alongside diagrams or pictures 
  • an oral presentation (three to four minutes), which may be a video or voice recording, or presented in front of the kaiako or class. 

Practical activities and the recording of observations can be performed as part of a group and are not assessed, but the analysis and interpretation of observations and the final presentation must be done individually.

Your findings could be presented in a variety of ways, such as: 

  • a digital or paper poster, infographic, or public service pamphlet, which will include detailed annotations alongside diagrams or pictures (up to 750-800 words)
  • a structured response (up to 750-800 words), with space to discuss what each observation shows about the relationship between microorganisms and their environment  
  • a video documentary to inform the target audience (three to four minutes) 
  • a slideshow (eight to ten slides) that will include text, detailed annotations, or a voiceover, alongside diagrams or pictures 
  • an oral presentation (three to four minutes), which may be a video or voice recording, or presented in front of the kaiako or class. 

Practical activities and the recording of observations can be performed as part of a group and are not assessed, but the analysis and interpretation of observations and the final presentation must be done individually.

Timeframe

Your Assessment Activity should take approximately four hours of class time to complete.

Checkpoints will occur (dates will be provided by your kaiako) for your kaiako to check your progress on: 

  • selecting relevant information recorded as observations from research to use in your presentation
  • developing your presentation.

Your Assessment Activity should take approximately four hours of class time to complete.

Checkpoints will occur (dates will be provided by your kaiako) for your kaiako to check your progress on: 

  • selecting relevant information recorded as observations from research to use in your presentation
  • developing your presentation.

Getting started

Before you get started, you will create a portfolio of observations from practical activities. These activities should model movement of Phytophthora in relation to kauri trees and the forest environment.

You are going to visit kauri forest on a field trip with your kaiako, or engage in a virtual field trip to an area that experiences kauri dieback.

You could also record observations when you:

  • engage in kōrero tuku iho with local hapū or iwi that speak to care of the ngahere
  • learn about the kauri tree, a taonga species found in Aotearoa New Zealand and the southwestern Pacific whose health is seen as a sign of general wellbeing of the ecosystem
  • learn about the interconnected nature of the kauri forest and consider all the plants, animals, fungi, protista, and microorganisms that may be present
  • hear from experts in the field that work in kauri forests such as iwi protection groups, conservation workers, tourist operators, or science technicians.

Your portfolio can include photographs and drawings as observations of microscopic yeast or bacteria or of cultures on agar plates, on potatoes, or on other media. Observations could be made from secondary sources such as kaiako demonstrations, video recordings, texts, or online publications. Practical work is not assessed, rather, your description, explanation, and recorded observations will be used to show your understanding.

Growing microorganism cultures is dangerous. Unwanted pathogens can easily be cultured, cause disease, or affect the health of others. For this reason, kaiako supervision is essential.

Before you get started, you will create a portfolio of observations from practical activities. These activities should model movement of Phytophthora in relation to kauri trees and the forest environment.

You are going to visit kauri forest on a field trip with your kaiako, or engage in a virtual field trip to an area that experiences kauri dieback.

You could also record observations when you:

  • engage in kōrero tuku iho with local hapū or iwi that speak to care of the ngahere
  • learn about the kauri tree, a taonga species found in Aotearoa New Zealand and the southwestern Pacific whose health is seen as a sign of general wellbeing of the ecosystem
  • learn about the interconnected nature of the kauri forest and consider all the plants, animals, fungi, protista, and microorganisms that may be present
  • hear from experts in the field that work in kauri forests such as iwi protection groups, conservation workers, tourist operators, or science technicians.

Your portfolio can include photographs and drawings as observations of microscopic yeast or bacteria or of cultures on agar plates, on potatoes, or on other media. Observations could be made from secondary sources such as kaiako demonstrations, video recordings, texts, or online publications. Practical work is not assessed, rather, your description, explanation, and recorded observations will be used to show your understanding.

Growing microorganism cultures is dangerous. Unwanted pathogens can easily be cultured, cause disease, or affect the health of others. For this reason, kaiako supervision is essential.

Student resources

Suggested starting resources:

You may also be able to explore the forests in your local area to locate important species around you with a guide from your school, whānau, community, or forest service. Consider the forest as an integrated system with many interconnections between living things. Consider why it is important to maintain and protect biodiversity in your rohe.

Suggested starting resources:

You may also be able to explore the forests in your local area to locate important species around you with a guide from your school, whānau, community, or forest service. Consider the forest as an integrated system with many interconnections between living things. Consider why it is important to maintain and protect biodiversity in your rohe.