What to do

You are going to explore the issue of waterway health as it relates to a waterway in your rohe. The waterway may be a river, lake, estuary, harbour, or similar.

Water is essential for life on earth. When waterways are unhealthy it affects humans, animals, and plants. 

Identify the issue:

  • choose an aspect of waterway health that generates more than one perspective. Your kaiako will support you to choose an aspect that is interesting to you and relates to science.

Note: A perspective is a particular way of regarding an issue. It is shared by a group. Examples of groups include:  

  • iwi or hapū 
  • a local council 
  • a company or business. 

Identify and explain:

  • a key science idea that informs a science perspective related to your selected waterway health issue.
  • another key perspective that relates to your selected issue and is informed by a knowledge system other than science
  • a science-informed response to your selected issue
  • things that could be done with a tiakitanga approach to this issue that would demonstrate guardianship for yourself, others, or the waterway. Explain how the approach considers tiakitanga.

Give reasons:

  • for the science-informed response that was taken to address your selected waterway health issue, why it was taken, and how it relates to both perspectives you have considered (science and another).

Discuss:

  • why it is important for decision makers to consider more than one perspective when making a science-informed response to an issue. Use examples from your explanation of a tiakitanga approach and waterway health to support your discussion.

You are going to explore the issue of waterway health as it relates to a waterway in your rohe. The waterway may be a river, lake, estuary, harbour, or similar.

Water is essential for life on earth. When waterways are unhealthy it affects humans, animals, and plants. 

Identify the issue:

  • choose an aspect of waterway health that generates more than one perspective. Your kaiako will support you to choose an aspect that is interesting to you and relates to science.

Note: A perspective is a particular way of regarding an issue. It is shared by a group. Examples of groups include:  

  • iwi or hapū 
  • a local council 
  • a company or business. 

Identify and explain:

  • a key science idea that informs a science perspective related to your selected waterway health issue.
  • another key perspective that relates to your selected issue and is informed by a knowledge system other than science
  • a science-informed response to your selected issue
  • things that could be done with a tiakitanga approach to this issue that would demonstrate guardianship for yourself, others, or the waterway. Explain how the approach considers tiakitanga.

Give reasons:

  • for the science-informed response that was taken to address your selected waterway health issue, why it was taken, and how it relates to both perspectives you have considered (science and another).

Discuss:

  • why it is important for decision makers to consider more than one perspective when making a science-informed response to an issue. Use examples from your explanation of a tiakitanga approach and waterway health to support your discussion.

How to present your learning

Your findings could be presented in a variety of ways such as:

  • a presentation (3-4 mins), that could be a video, a voice recording, or a live presentation in front of the kaiako or class
  • a digital or paper poster, infographic, or slideshow (8-10 slides) that will include detailed annotations alongside diagrams or pictures
  • a video or animation (3-4 mins) 
  • a written article, report, or blog (750-800 words), in te reo Māori, English or braille which may also include visual or tactile diagrams or pictures.

You must be actively involved in any group component to this assessment, and you will need to identify your contribution.

Your findings could be presented in a variety of ways such as:

  • a presentation (3-4 mins), that could be a video, a voice recording, or a live presentation in front of the kaiako or class
  • a digital or paper poster, infographic, or slideshow (8-10 slides) that will include detailed annotations alongside diagrams or pictures
  • a video or animation (3-4 mins) 
  • a written article, report, or blog (750-800 words), in te reo Māori, English or braille which may also include visual or tactile diagrams or pictures.

You must be actively involved in any group component to this assessment, and you will need to identify your contribution.

Timeframe

You will have 4-6 hours of class time to complete the final Assessment Activity.

Your kaiako will provide details of:  

  • the time you have to prepare for your assessment 
  • any checkpoints 
  • the final submission date and time.  

You will have 4-6 hours of class time to complete the final Assessment Activity.

Your kaiako will provide details of:  

  • the time you have to prepare for your assessment 
  • any checkpoints 
  • the final submission date and time.  

Getting started

Explore waterway health in the context of a local waterway. Before you identify the aspect of science that you want to focus on for your issue you will need to:

  • find general information on science relevant to the health of your local waterway such as:
    • factors that influence waterway health
    • indicators of waterway health such as oxygen content, phosphates, nitrates, or turbidity
    • how waterway health affects the plants, animals and microorganisms that live in it.
  • spend time investigating the different perspectives that groups hold on the health of your local waterway
    • consider how people use the waterway
    • talk to people from groups involved in the issue like the kaumātua from the local iwi, Department of Conservation, recreational fishers, boaters or hunters.
  • think about tiakitanga in the context of your local waterway. Consider how care, ownership, or responsibility are shown through things such as:
    • access to the waterway
    • monitoring the impact of how the waterway is used
    • implementation of national, regional or local policy or partnerships.

Your kaiako can provide resources as a starting point.

Explore waterway health in the context of a local waterway. Before you identify the aspect of science that you want to focus on for your issue you will need to:

  • find general information on science relevant to the health of your local waterway such as:
    • factors that influence waterway health
    • indicators of waterway health such as oxygen content, phosphates, nitrates, or turbidity
    • how waterway health affects the plants, animals and microorganisms that live in it.
  • spend time investigating the different perspectives that groups hold on the health of your local waterway
    • consider how people use the waterway
    • talk to people from groups involved in the issue like the kaumātua from the local iwi, Department of Conservation, recreational fishers, boaters or hunters.
  • think about tiakitanga in the context of your local waterway. Consider how care, ownership, or responsibility are shown through things such as:
    • access to the waterway
    • monitoring the impact of how the waterway is used
    • implementation of national, regional or local policy or partnerships.

Your kaiako can provide resources as a starting point.